The Good Book…and other good books

One must always be careful of books,” said Tessa, “and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us.
― Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel

My mother taught me to read before I started kindergarten. She set up a classroom in our garage, complete with a blackboard and flash cards. By the time I reached first grade, I had already read a number of the classics, including Jane Eyre and Moby Dick. My teacher was not impressed. She tried to force me to read books geared towards my age group despite my protestations that I could read the big kids’ books. My mother’s solution was to continue to take me to the public library, where I was allowed to check out any book that struck my fancy. In addition to the classics, I gravitated towards books about archaeology, paleontology, psychic phenomena and the occult.

Books quickly became my refuge from a difficult relationship with my mother and extreme social awkwardness. They provided a barrier between me and other people while simultaneously opening limitless doors to fantastic worlds and ideas.

Books played — and continue to play — an important role in forming my religious and spiritual beliefs. Although God and religion weren’t something that we talked about in our home, my father took me to the Presbyterian church where he was a deacon. I attended Sunday school before the main service, but didn’t see how the Bible stories they told were relevant to my life. I didn’t gain much clarity when I read the King James version of the Bible from cover to cover a few years later.

My parents send me to a Southern Baptist school in my early teens so I wouldn’t be “bussed” to a school in a black neighborhood. I was thrust into the world of Fundamental Christianity, where Jesus would save those who professed to believe in Him while everyone else was damned to hell fire and brimstone. On one hand, I “bought” the message; I was terrified not to. On the other, I had already been exposed to numerous different religions and spiritual concepts — not to mention the occult, which was verboten to “born again” Christians — through books.

During my Fundamentalist Christianity phase, I read read a couple of modern translations of the Bible, including Good News for Modern ManThese were widely criticized by some Christians for their use of the vernacular but, for me, getting rid of the “thees” and “thous” made the Bible and its message accessible and relevant.

I also read lots of books about missionaries while continuing to check out tomes on the occult. I knew that my preacher, who was the school principle, and my classmates would never understand, so I didn’t divulge my interest in the paranormal to them. But even at that tender age I knew that religion and spirituality weren’t as black and white as they believed.

The list below includes a small sampling of the myriad books that had an impact on my spiritual path. I’ve tried my best to list the ones that made the most impact, but it is in no way comprehensive.

Did books play a major role in forming your personal “theology”? If so, which ones? Please share with my readers and me in the Comments section!

The Bible — Judeo/Christian

The Cross and the Switchblade by David R. Wilkerson — The story of an “urban missionary,” this book is about and geared towards teens

The Seven Story Mountain by Thomas Merton — An account of Merton’s journey to becoming a Trappist monk, his spiritual struggles and reflections

Alone Of All Her Sex: The Myth and the Cult of the Virgin Mary by Marina Warner — A scholarly work analyzing the connections between pagan goddess worship and the role that the Catholic church created for the Virgin Mary

The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith — AA’s guidebook to working the 12 steps in order to recover from alcoholism…one day at a time

The Zen of Recovery by Mel Ash — Draws parallels between Zen Buddhism and 12-step recovery

The Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley — Arthurian legend told through the eyes of the female characters, including Morgaine (aka Morgan le Fay), a priestess struggling to preserve Celtic paganism during the rise of Christianity

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner by Scott Cunningham — A gentle, supportive introduction to Wicca geared towards people who practice alone by choice or through necessity

 

 

 

 

3 thoughts on “The Good Book…and other good books

  1. Oh my, what an interesting upbringing! Given your father was a deacon I am left wondering why why religion and God were not topics discussed in your home. Your path has been littered with a diversity of values and beliefs which has led you to where you are now – an eclectic spiritualist 🙂 My path was very different. Both my parents were very immersed in the Lutheran Church with Dad eventually studying into the ministry in his 40’s after we migrated to Australia. He served the Finnish migrants so a lot of his work involved social work type support as well. I really did not seriously start to question traditional religions till adulthood. The conclusion I have come to is that to a large extent organised religion is a manmade construct with all the foibles that go hand in hand with ego, power, corruption etc etc. That is not to say that there aren’t good, genuine, heart centred people there. Of course there are. Spirituality, on the other hand, is a more intimate and deeper, personal connection. We don’t need ‘go betweens’ or permission to have a close relationship with God. Many paths lead to God.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Judie Sigdel

      I honestly don’t know why religion wasn’t discussed in my home. The only time my mother mentioned it was to throw my faith back into my face whenever I did something she didn’t like. “You used to be such a good little Christian…”

      How interesting that your dad became a minister in his 40’s!

      This, with minor modifications, is at the heart of what I believe: “The conclusion I have come to is that to a large extent organised religion is a manmade construct with all the foibles that go hand in hand with ego, power, corruption etc etc. That is not to say that there aren’t good, genuine, heart centred people there. Of course there are. Spirituality, on the other hand, is a more intimate and deeper, personal connection. We don’t need ‘go betweens’ or permission to have a close relationship with God. Many paths lead to God.” Beautifully said…!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I think there are many out there who are becoming increasingly dissatisfied with organised religion, but have yet to find how to fill that void- that innate need for a spiritual connection to the Divine. Perhaps that is partly what is creating all the chaos in the world.

        Liked by 1 person

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